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crucifixion redemption salvation Uncategorized

BLACK FRIDAY

Neal Pollard

It was September 24, 1869. The Civll War was barely an excruciating national memory and the nation was rebuilding. That specific day was a Friday, the day a cruel scheme by two Wall Street investors was discovered and led to an implosion of the Stock Market. It was referred to as “Black Friday.” The tie of this term to the Christmas shopping season is also surprising. In the 1950s, the Philadelphia police department used the phrase to describe the mayhem brought by the combination of suburban shoppers, tourists, attendees of the Army-Navy football game, and increased shoplifting in stores. They would have to work extra-long shifts this day after Thanksgiving. It was a derogatory term until relatively recently, when retailers in the late 1980s co-opted the expression to depict the day as the day retailers were trying to take their businesses from the “red” to the “black.” This meant bargains for shoppers, the best day to get out and shop and spend. While the advent of online shopping and retail promotions have created new and additional days of holiday shopping deals, “Black Friday” still symbolizes the happy time of “the most wonderful time of the year” (information from Sarah Pruitt, History Channel). 

For the Christian, black Friday was the day darkness fell over the whole land of Palestine around 30 A.D. (Mat. 27:45). It had to take place to save humanity who were sitting in the darkness of sin (Mat. 4:16) facing the grim prospect of eternal, outer darkness (Mat. 8:12; 22:13; 25:30). It was a horrible day. It was a day of seeming loss, with Jesus’ followers sensing total defeat. Jesus was undergoing six hours of horrific torture before succumbing to death. Satan seemed victorious. But God, according to His eternal, humbling, and essential plan, took that day of darkness and defeat and used it to bring the only profit that ultimately matters. It was actually a day of triumph (Col. 2:15). It became a day of victory for us (1 John 5:4). What turned that day from sorrow to joy was the Sunday that followed that Friday. That Friday death was God’s gift to the whole world, and it profits anyone who responds to it by obedient faith (Rom. 6). 

This Sunday (and every Sunday), we get to celebrate this gift and what it means to us when we take the Lord’s Supper. We think back on those dark events, thank God for what they mean to us now, and look ahead with hope and assurance to what it means for our eternal destiny. It was a day of defeat, but God transformed it into the day of victory! 

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Jesus Jesus Christ Uncategorized

He Understands Me

Neal Pollard

Marge Singleton and Merle Kilgore cowrote a song that was a hit for Teresa Brewer at the end of the “doo wop” era, entitled “He Understands Me.”  The heart of the lyrics, which are repeated, is: “He understands me the way you never did. He loves me the way you never did. 

He takes the time to notice I’m around. He builds me up, he never lets me down.” This is obviously a song about young love and a young woman who has found somebody much better than her “ex.” This is the age old complaint of many a man and woman, of feeling taken for granted. 

But in the most important relationship you can have, you have Someone who understands you better than you understand you. He wants a relationship with you and He went further to prove it than anyone else ever will or could. He left a place of safety to suffer. He left a position of supremacy to be a servant. He left the peer-ship of sovereignty for submission. He limited Himself to humanity without surrendering His deity to save the most important of every person, including you.  Because He successfully navigated the perils of this life, He can offer you eternal life.

Meanwhile, there are daily benefits for you because “the Word became flesh” (John 1:1-2,14). 

Intercession. Paul says, “Who is the one who condemns (cf. lays a charge against God’s elect, 33)? Christ Jesus is He who died, yes, rather who was raised, who is at the right hand of God, who also intercedes for us” (Rom. 8:34). The Hebrews’ writer adds, “He always lives to make intercession for [those who draw near to God through Him]” (Heb. 7:25). He earnestly appeals to God with urgency and intensity for you. Try to picture that. He’s addressing God for you!

Intervention. Hebrews 2, which warns against the possibility of drifting away from Jesus, gives a multitude of reasons why you would never want to do that. One reason was He became one of us to die for us (9). His appearance here helped Him understand by experience your struggles (10). He claims you as spiritual family (11-13). He went to war with the devil for you and won (14-15). He gives you help (16). He paved the way for God’s favor toward you (17). The writer says He had to become one of us to be a “merciful and faithful high priest…,” and being tempted “He is able to come to the aid of those who are tempted” (17-18). When you appeal to Him for help, He will!

Invitation. Knowing that Jesus has been through what you’ve been through, by itself, is comforting. Hebrews 4:15 says your high priest sympathizes with your weaknesses, having been tempted in all things like you are except that He never sinned. Those facts lead to a consequence, signaled by the “therefore” of verse 16. Because Jesus successfully took your place, you get to go someplace you otherwise never could! You can go directly to the Father’s throne of grace. You can do so confidently (boldly!). When you do, you will not only find “help” (same word as “aid” in 2:18) but you also grab hold of mercy and grace. You can step inside the greatest power source in the universe for help, pity, and favor, and you are invited to do so!

Do you know why you have intercession, intervention, and invitation? Because He understands you! He’s been through what you’ve been through. He knows. He gets it. But, combined with that, “He is able” (Heb. 7:25)! Are you taking advantage of these benefits? Why would any of us neglect to do so?

weeping

Categories
Christ cross salvation

What The Blood Of Christ Meant

Neal Pollard

  • To Christ, an expression of love (John 15:13)
  • To God, an appeasement of His wrath (Rom. 5:9).
  • To the Devil, the scribes, and Pharisees, a sign of their supposed victory (Heb. 2:14; John 19:6ff).
  • To the mob, apparent weakness (Mat. 27:42).
  • To the disciples, seeming defeat (John 21:3).
  • To those who lived rebelliously, nothing (1 Cor. 1:17).
  • To those who died in disobedience, an essential but missing element (cf. John 6:53).
  • To those who lived obediently, atonement (Eph. 1:7).
  • To those who died having walked in the light, everything (1 Jn. 1:7).

Untold millions are unaware of the value of the blood of Jesus. You and I must decide what the blood of Jesus means to us. Interestingly, in four different ways, the Bible tells us that what the blood does for us we obtain the benefit of through baptism.
—The blood of Christ sanctifies (Heb. 13:12). We are sanctified by baptism (Eph. 5:25-27).
—The blood of Christ washes away sins (Rev. 1:5-6). Sins are washed away at baptism (Acts 22:16).
—The blood of Christ remits sins (Mat. 26:28). Sins are remitted through baptism (Acts 2:38).
—Jesus shed His blood in His death (John 19:34). We contact the dead of Jesus at baptism (Romans 6:3-4).
The Bible makes clear not just what the blood of Christ means to our souls, but also how we get the benefit of that blood. May we do what God says do to receive the benefits of Jesus’ blood and continue to walk in the light of Christ in order to have that blood continually cleanse us from all unrighteousness (1 Jn. 1:7).