He Understands Me

He Understands Me

Neal Pollard

Marge Singleton and Merle Kilgore cowrote a song that was a hit for Teresa Brewer at the end of the “doo wop” era, entitled “He Understands Me.”  The heart of the lyrics, which are repeated, is: “He understands me the way you never did. He loves me the way you never did. 

He takes the time to notice I’m around. He builds me up, he never lets me down.” This is obviously a song about young love and a young woman who has found somebody much better than her “ex.” This is the age old complaint of many a man and woman, of feeling taken for granted. 

But in the most important relationship you can have, you have Someone who understands you better than you understand you. He wants a relationship with you and He went further to prove it than anyone else ever will or could. He left a place of safety to suffer. He left a position of supremacy to be a servant. He left the peer-ship of sovereignty for submission. He limited Himself to humanity without surrendering His deity to save the most important of every person, including you.  Because He successfully navigated the perils of this life, He can offer you eternal life.

Meanwhile, there are daily benefits for you because “the Word became flesh” (John 1:1-2,14). 

Intercession. Paul says, “Who is the one who condemns (cf. lays a charge against God’s elect, 33)? Christ Jesus is He who died, yes, rather who was raised, who is at the right hand of God, who also intercedes for us” (Rom. 8:34). The Hebrews’ writer adds, “He always lives to make intercession for [those who draw near to God through Him]” (Heb. 7:25). He earnestly appeals to God with urgency and intensity for you. Try to picture that. He’s addressing God for you!

Intervention. Hebrews 2, which warns against the possibility of drifting away from Jesus, gives a multitude of reasons why you would never want to do that. One reason was He became one of us to die for us (9). His appearance here helped Him understand by experience your struggles (10). He claims you as spiritual family (11-13). He went to war with the devil for you and won (14-15). He gives you help (16). He paved the way for God’s favor toward you (17). The writer says He had to become one of us to be a “merciful and faithful high priest…,” and being tempted “He is able to come to the aid of those who are tempted” (17-18). When you appeal to Him for help, He will!

Invitation. Knowing that Jesus has been through what you’ve been through, by itself, is comforting. Hebrews 4:15 says your high priest sympathizes with your weaknesses, having been tempted in all things like you are except that He never sinned. Those facts lead to a consequence, signaled by the “therefore” of verse 16. Because Jesus successfully took your place, you get to go someplace you otherwise never could! You can go directly to the Father’s throne of grace. You can do so confidently (boldly!). When you do, you will not only find “help” (same word as “aid” in 2:18) but you also grab hold of mercy and grace. You can step inside the greatest power source in the universe for help, pity, and favor, and you are invited to do so!

Do you know why you have intercession, intervention, and invitation? Because He understands you! He’s been through what you’ve been through. He knows. He gets it. But, combined with that, “He is able” (Heb. 7:25)! Are you taking advantage of these benefits? Why would any of us neglect to do so?

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I Sin Against The Lord When I Don’t Pray For You

I Sin Against The Lord When I Don’t Pray For You

Neal Pollard

Jonathan Martindale punctuated an unforgettable worship service yesterday morning with one of the most thoughtful prayers I have ever been privileged to be a part of. What made it so effective was the people and issues he prayed about. This is not exhaustive, but here are some of the specific people he prayed for among his beautiful words.

  • Individuals in nursing homes that are facing the end of life (they believe they are prepared for eternity, but are not)
  • Individuals who are in college who are not being adequately equipped for the challenges and skepticism being thrown at them (both those who are fighting for their faith and those who have started to drift)
  • Individuals who are have been rocked by broken families
  • High Schoolers who are dealing with temptation
  • Junior high youth (trying to figure out who they are in life and those dealing with depression)
  • Elementary kids that have not made the decision to follow Christ yet but still need prayers to learn Christ correctly and led to that decision.
  • Those who are in the world who are perfectly content with where they are but still do not have Christ
  • Those who are good moral people but don’t have Christ
  • Those who are in the world and caught up with various vices (drinking, drug use, pornography)
  • Those who have fallen away (and our being visionary and courageous to help them)

That prayer reflected true thoughtfulness, contemplating those who are lost or drifting. While I’ve heard other prayers devoted to groups of people, I cannot remember one exactly like Jonathan’s.

It reminded me of Samuel’s words to Israel after the coronation of Saul. They had sinned against God by rejecting Him as their king. He assured them of God’s care, adding, “Far be it from me that I should sin against the Lord by ceasing to pray for you” (1 Sam. 12:23). It seems that, in principle, we can be guilty of sinning against God and our spiritual family by not praying for them. James encourages praying for one another when sin infiltrates our lives (Jas. 5:16). The church prayed for Peter (Acts 12:5). Paul wanted Thessalonica to pray for him (1 Th. 5:25; 2 Th. 3:1). So did the writer of Hebrews (13:18).  So often, Jesus and His inspired spokesmen urged His followers to carefully, considerately pray for each other.

Let’s take every opportunity to do that today. Sit down and make a list of people—especially those who may get overlooked. Then, pray for them. Be as specific as you can about them. Talk with them and find out what they need from us in prayer. What a hedge of protection we may be giving one another by taking the time to pray for each other. What a huge blessing we can be for one another through prayer!

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THE RESCUER AND THE ONE IN TROUBLE

THE RESCUER AND THE ONE IN TROUBLE

Neal Pollard

In Romans 8:26, speaking of the work of the Holy Spirit, Paul writes, “ In the same way the Spirit also helps our weakness; for we do not know how to pray as we should, but the Spirit Himself intercedes for us with groanings too deep for words.” The Holy Spirit “helps,” lending “a hand together with, at the same time with one” (AT Robertson) and coming to the aid of one (Bauer). This is said in connection with the Christian’s prayer life. It is an acknowledgement that sometimes we need the help of God’s Spirit in particularly agonizing times, times where words like “weakness” and “groanings” describe the struggles in prayer.

In the same passage, Paul says the Spirit “intercedes,” a picturesque word of rescue by one who ‘happens’ on one who is in trouble and ‘in his behalf’ pleads with ‘unuttered groanings’ or with ‘sighs that baffle words’” (Reinecker 367). What graphic imagery! When I am in real trouble, no one can help me like God can. Sometimes, only God can help me when I am in trouble. Paul teaches that there is no depth of struggle or trial in prayer too complex or incomprehensible for the omniscient God. As the Psalmist once wrote, “Out of the depths I have cried to You, O Lord. Lord, hear my voice! Let Your ears be attentive to the voice of my supplications” (Ps. 130:1). Paul is saying, “The Lord does hear and is attentive not only to my voice, but even to the unspoken, unutterable fears, desires, and longings in my heart that cannot be formed into words on my lips when I pray.

Our God is a God of rescue (Ps. 18:19; 116:8; 136:24). He has rescued man in dramatic ways, from the Red Sea crossing to Jericho to Gideon’s tiny army to Calvary’s cross. He has demonstrated that He wants to help us and will freely extend Himself to do so. But, He wants us to reach out to Him and appeal for help. Even when the words will not exactly come to us, He knows the intent and desire and He looks with an eye toward aiding His children (1 Pet. 3:12). Do not only come to Him when in trouble, but do come to Him when in trouble. You do not have trouble too big for Him to come along and rescue you from it.

Trust that!

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The Reality Of Jesus Christ

The Reality Of Jesus Christ

Johnson Kell

He was born of a virgin and when He was about thirty years of age He was baptized in the Jordan River by John the Baptist. And being full of the Holy Spirit He began His ministry walking the dusty roads of Judea, Samaria and Galilee, performing miracles and preaching the gospel. And He did go out carrying His own cross toward Calvary, and He did hang there for hours writhing in anguish and pain. And He did cry out, “My God, My God, why have You forsaken Me?” He did die there, shedding His blood for the sins of the world.

But there was a resurrection and He spent forty days with His apostles providing many proofs of a bodily resurrection–the tomb was found empty. And after forty days He spoke to them for the last time and as they watched intently He disappeared through the clouds on His way back to heaven. Some time later, when Stephen was being stoned to death, he cried out, “I see the heavens opened and the Son of man standing at the right hand of God.”

And so we have the assurance that our Savior is at His Father’s side making intercession for each one of us. And we can recall in the letter that the apostle Paul wrote to the Christians in Colosse, where he cried, “Christ in you the hope of glory!” So as we are born-again children, we, too, can say, “Christ in us the hope of glory!”

This was and this is the reality of Jesus Christ.

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