Longing For Hope

Longing For Hope

Thursday’s Column: Captain’s Blog

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Carl Pollard

We’ve spent three weeks looking at a few areas where the world is desperate. They long for guidance, purpose and finally, hope (1 Pt. 5:10).
We have abused this word. We say things like, “I hope there’s some food at the house” or, “I hope the weather is nice tomorrow,” and “I hope my team wins the super bowl.” The hope that’s mentioned is scripture has a completely different definition.
The word in Romans 15:13, for example, is the Greek word “elpis. “Now may the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that you will abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.” This word is defined as, “looking forward to something with confidence” (BDAG 319).  It is an expectation that we have as Christian. We have hope because we call God our Father.
The world does not and because of this they have nothing to hope in. If they look forward to anything it’s pay day or the weekend or vacations. Every one of these come to an end and once again they are left with no hope.
Don’t get me wrong, we look forward to these things too. And there’s nothing wrong with that, but this isn’t what we look forward to solely. We know that there is more to life than vacation.
1 Peter 5:10 is an incredible verse that describes the hope we have. It says, “After you have suffered for a little while, the God of all grace, who called you to His eternal glory in Christ, will Himself perfect, confirm, strengthen and establish you.”
This is true hope. This is the God of the universe Himself that will do this for each one of his children. We may not see it every day, but the world is lost and desperate. We have what they need. They’re desperate for guidance because they’re lost. They’re desperate for purpose because they have none. They’re desperate for Hope because the world offers nothing to those who are struggling.
God has entrusted us with the answers to life, so what are we doing with this knowledge?
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The Suffering Of Jesus And Commitment

The Suffering Of Jesus And Commitment

Neal Pollard

Jesus died an awful death. Ruthless assassins, terrorists, sadistic and serial killers, savage and perverted criminals have all received much more humane treatment than He received that day. What Jesus endured at the cross can only be described as vicious. Consider the violent aspects of His crucifixion.

There was physical torture. He was scourged, beaten with a jagged whip (Mat. 27:27). He was fitted with a crown of thorns (Mat. 27:29). He was hit on the head repeatedly with a staff (Mat. 27:30). The soldiers struck Him with their hands (John 19:3). He carried His heavy cross until it fell on Him (John 19:17). He was nailed to that cross (John 20:25).

There was mental anguish. His countrymen hatefully yelled for His death (Mat. 27:25). Soldiers mocked Him and pretended to worship Him (Mat. 27:29). People hurled abuse at Him (Mat. 27:39,40). Religious leaders mocked Him (Mat. 27:44). The Heavenly Father left Him alone (Mat. 27:46). His disciples followed Him, mourning and wailing (Luke 23:37). Earlier, all His disciples forsook Him and fled (Mark 14:50).

There was social embarrassment. They stripped Him (Mat. 27:25). He was spit upon (Mat. 27:30). The soldiers gambled for His clothes (Mat. 27:35). He was watched like a sideshow (Mat. 27:36). They jokingly put an elegant, purple robe on Him (Luke 23:11). He endured great shame (Heb. 12:2).

The sheer brutality of the crucifixion tells one how serious sin is! The proposal from heaven is, “Stop sinning and serve the Savior!” In the light of the cross, examine Heaven’s every demand, command, and reprimand. What expectation from the Father or requirement from the Son is too great? Before answering, look back at the cross!

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We Walk By Sight And Not By Faith

We Walk By Sight And Not By Faith

Neal Pollard

Yes, Paul does say it the other way in 2 Corinthians 5:7, and this isn’t an attempt to contradict the Holy Spirit there. His message, in that context, is trust in a Lord you can’t physically see rather than place your faith in what might be set up as an alternative to Him.  Evolutionists reject the idea of God because He cannot be quantified, measured, sampled, or empirically experienced. They walk by sight. Some give up the Christian life because they have a preference for the things of the flesh, things they can experience through their senses.

Some are putting their faith in the wrong things while failing to look in the right direction. Consider what God says in His Word about this.

Some things do not deserve our faith and trust:

  • Military might or weapons (Ps. 44:6)
  • Brute force or robbery (Ps. 62:10)
  • Government or nobility (Ps. 146:3)
  • Self-delusion (Jer. 7:4)
  • Sinful associates (Jer. 9:4)
  • Men and women who aren’t loyal to the Lord (Mic. 7:5)
  • Ourselves as opposed to God (2 Co. 1:9)
  • The uncertainty of riches (1 Ti. 6:17)

But, sometimes God urged us to “see”:

  • “Behold the Lamb of God” (Jn. 1:29)
  • We “look” for Jesus to come from Heaven some day (Ph. 3:20)
  • We are to be found “looking for the blessed hope and His glorious appearing” (Ti. 2:13)
  • We “see Jesus,” One who by God’s grace died for everyone (He. 2:9)
  • We “look” unto Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith (He. 12:2)
  • We are to “see to it” that we do not come short of God’s grace (He. 12:15)
  • We are to be found “looking for the coming of the day of God” (2 Pe. 3:12).

Obviously, this is a play on words. The only way to “see” the things God urges is “by faith.” And, as Paul writes, “Hope that is seen is not hope; for why does one also hope for what he sees?” (Ro. 8:24b).

The exhortation of the Bible is to “wake up” and think about what it is you put your trust in. Is it a good job? Is it a “perfect” relationship? Is it money? Is it pleasure? Is it things? Is it power and control? Is it family? Is it recreation? What is it? Is it the Bible? Is it Christ? Is it heaven? We should walk by spiritual sight, never by misguided faith!

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