God Desires Humility

God Desires Humility

Friday’s Column: “Captain’s Blog”

Carl Pollard

The life of a true Christian is filled with change. We learn where we are weak, and try to be better. It’s kind of like a never ending home improvement project. There will always be areas of our spiritual walk with God that could be better. Because this is the case, many religious books, sermons and Gospel meetings are created around a theme that will help us to grow. In the Church there is a plethora of information to help us in our Christianity, but I want to focus on the basics and answer a vital question. What does it mean to be a Christian?


I want to answer this question with a passage in scripture that we may not immediately think of. We may think of 1 Timothy 1:5, or 2 Peter 1:5-7, which are great verses, but I’d like to suggest that Jesus in Luke 18:15-17 gives us the bottom line of Christianity.


It reads, “Now they were bringing even infants to him that he might touch them. And when the disciples saw it, they rebuked them. But Jesus called them to him, saying, “Let the children come to me, and do not hinder them, for to such belongs the kingdom of God. Truly, I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God like a child shall not enter it.”


Jesus teaches the importance of humility. You want to enter the Kingdom of God? Have an attitude of humility. He uses the example of children, and Luke even uses the Greek word for infant. These are very young kids and babies that are being brought to Jesus. So He uses this as a moment to teach a valuable lesson.


Babies show their humility in their inability to provide for themselves. Every child that is born is completely dependent on its parents and has a wholehearted trust in them to provide what they need. What does it mean to be a Christian? It means being humble enough to admit that we need God. It means we trust in God, rather than our own “power.”


Humility plays an important role in every aspect of Christianity. It helps with showing love to others, it helps us subject ourselves to God’s Word, it helps us treat others the way we want to be treated, it helps us accept the hard topics that scripture contains, and the list goes on and on.


Do you want to be a part of the Kingdom? Make humility an everyday practice. That is what it means to be a Christian.

Infant laying on soft white blanket with black background
Is Your Life “Award Winning”?

Is Your Life “Award Winning”?

Neal Pollard

CBS News reports on 19-year-old Chris Strickland, a very ordinary young man who seems unaware of how heroic his split-second action was. In his first job, Chris, working at a Home Depot in Anchorage, Alaska, happened to turn around and face a shopping cart at the moment an unattended baby fell out of a baby seat sitting atop it.  Store surveillance video captures the whole thing, as Strickland rushes over and reaches out to catch the falling infant.  For this simple, profoundly important act, Strickland will receive the Home Depot Angel Award, “reserved for those who perform exceptional acts of heroism” (via http://www.cbsnews.com/news/quick-thinking-home-depot-employee-saves-falling-baby/).

If all goes well, some day that baby will grow up, maybe get married and have children, and, optimists might say, do some great thing—become president, save an entire burning building full of people, or, better yet, become a faithful Christian responsible for scores of folks getting to heaven.  No matter what happens with the child, it will not diminish the heroism of this young man who, at the right place and right time, chose to save another human being and one literally helpless.

In 2 Timothy 4:8, Paul speaks of Christ giving an unequaled reward on the Judgment Day.  It will be for those heros and heroines who loved His coming and appearance, who fought, finished, and kept the faith (7).  In a parable about the Judgment, Jesus speaks of the award winning “sheep” who will enter heaven.  What did they do?  Cared for those who had needs.  James 1:12 speaks of a reward Christ will personally give to those who persevere under trial.

You didn’t consider yourself a “hero,” did you?  Passages like those above speak of how ordinary folks like us can receive the highest honor of all time and eternity.  How?  By faithful endurance, service, and response to Jesus, the Lord!  Congratulations!

Awaiting The Royal Birth

Awaiting The Royal Birth

Neal Pollard

If you are plugged in to just about any sort of media, you have likely heard news reports about the looming birth of Prince William and Duchess Kate’s baby.  The whole of the United Kingdom seem to be waiting with bated breath, if what is being written and said is to be believed.  Certainly, to call this event “hyped” is not an exaggeration.  Given that the monarchy in the U.K. is a symbolic figurehead rather than the seat of any real power today, such fascination and, in some corners, obsession is curious.  But that it exists cannot be denied.

What a contrast this birth and so many like it in palaces and kingdoms all around the world throughout human history are to the events surrounding the One born in Bethlehem two millennia ago.  With absolutely no fanfare, advance notice, or even slightest curiosity, Jesus Christ was born in obscurity and poverty.  While prophesy foresaw that moment (Micah 5:2), not even those who ran the local inn in that tiny village recognized the magnitude of that coming moment (Luke 2:7).  The Savior of the whole world made His entrance virtually without notice.

Certainly that is no criticism of the abundant fascination of many around the world at the birth of the British babe.  But, no birth affected mankind like that unheralded moment in Israel 2,000 years ago.  John introduces Him, saying, “There was the true Light which, coming into the world, enlightens every man. He was in the world, and the world was made through Him, and the world did not know Him. He came to His own, and those who were His own did not receive Him” (John 1:9-11).

Thank God for His saving plan, executed with the wisdom only Deity could conceive.  The nature of the birth of Christ shows the Divine emphasis of the spiritual over the material.  Paul says it this way, “For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though He was rich, yet for your sake He became poor, so that you through His poverty might become rich” (2 Cor. 8:9).  He came by way of the manger that we may inherit the riches of heaven!  That is news worthy of spreading every way we can.