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evangelism ministry soul-winning Uncategorized

Some Practical Tips For Personal Evangelism

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Dale Pollard

  •  If you have time, avoid self checkouts. You have a golden opportunity to talk to employees while they’re scanning your items. Make them smile, be happy, be natural, and if they open up look for that chance to invite them to church or study. Just breaking out of your shell and chatting with everyone you come in contact with will eventually open doors. If people can tell you care they’ll be more inclined to, at the very least, hear you out.
  • Try not to be an “office rat” and be intentional about creating friendships. Your neighbors, members neighbors, and coworkers of members can be a good foot in the door. If they end up visiting they’ll be more comfortable seeing a familiar face sitting in the pews and a friendly face of someone who cared enough to reach out to them in the pulpit. That also makes the message you preach to them more powerful.
  • If they’re interested in studying, start with what you have in common with each other or how God can help them with a specific problem that’s unique to him/her.
  • If they struggle with addiction, relationship with spouse, anger, depression, or heartache, start there. That’s what’s on their mind and they need to know how God can heal and improve our lives. If they clearly see their need for Jesus they’ll want to know more about Him.
  • Be intentional about talking with as many people as possible. Look for the lonely or hurting people. The guy eating alone at a restaurant, anxious/worried person in the hospital waiting room, single parents with small children, homeless people, elderly people sitting on their front porch, or people coming out of Cash In A Flash. These are the people who most likely need to hear some Good News.
  • Volunteer at funeral homes to preach for free for grieving families that can’t afford to spend much.
  • Ask the staff at hospitals/retirement homes about any occupants that may not get many visitors.

Minister to people all week and not just on Sunday.

Categories
attitude church church growth ministry relationships

The Word Is “Relationship”

Neal Pollard

Soon, we’ll have lived in our current home for two years.  We are enjoying the house, the location, the neighborhood, and most of the neighbors. However, one that lives pretty nearby has proven less than pleasant.  His wife is an officer in our neighborhood HOA, and each month’s newsletter is a new posting of the hierarchy’s “95 theses.”  Hardly anyone can keep from committing at least one infraction—certainly not us.  They’ve had very little communication with us except when the husband complained that our compost pile was too close to the fence (on the other side of which were his garbage cans).  Recently, while seeking our permission to re-paint their house, he took the opportunity to inspect the state of cleanliness of our garage.  I share his desire that we keep our homes and yards in good shape, as property values are riding on our collective interest in such.  The problem for them is that they have spurned our efforts at a relationship and they have done nothing to create one themselves.  Thus, we tolerate and peacefully co-exist.  But, there is no relationship.

Have you thought about how vital relationships are to our lives?  Think about how ineffective we are with people without them.  At best, we are mere associates. At worst, we become antagonists.  Think of how vital the entity of relationship is to:

  • Marriage (1 Pet. 3:7).
  • Parenting (Deu. 6:1ff).
  • A congregation (1 Th. 5:11).
  • Shepherding (John 10:4-5).
  • Church discipline (2 Cor. 2:6-8).
  • Restoring the erring (Gal. 6:1-2).
  • Preaching (2 Tim. 2:24-26; 4:2).
  • Church works (Eph. 4:16).
  • Deacons’ work (Acts 6:7).
  • Soul-winning (Col. 4:2-6).
  • Friendship (Prov. 18:24b).

Taking the time to build rapport may be mentally and emotionally exhausting at times.  The best of relationships will have their downs as well as their ups.  But God created us social beings not meant for isolation (Gen. 2:18).  Joel O’Steen is shallow and superficial in his “preaching,” but tens of thousands of people are drawn to him because they find him relatable. His message is deadly, but his method is engaging.  Some who consider themselves the staunchest “defenders of the faith” are virtual porcupines with their quills primed to stick those in their proximity.  Surely those of us striving to follow New Testament Christianity can strive to build relationships while we steadfastly teach and follow the truth.  How much more effective will we be as we conquer this principle every day?