We Gotta Stop!

We Gotta Stop!

Wednesday’s Column: Third’s Words

Gary Pollard

If you’re reading this right now, it means you have access to electricity and internet. If you have access to those, you’re already familiar with the subject of this article. This specifically applies to Christians living in the United States, but I encourage those who don’t consider themselves religious to think about the following as well. There’s no other way to address this, so I apologize for having to write it.

“Let’s go Brandon” is everywhere: gas pumps, sporting events, social media posts, bumper stickers, etc. I thought it would die out by now, but it’s everywhere. I see it almost every day on gaming platforms, with many adopting some form of it as a username/handle. It’s become colloquial, used to “thank” the president for any less-than-ideal circumstance.

I am not a fan of our current president. If you drive, you know how much gas is right now. Afghanistan. The Russian ammo ban (and other anti-freedom measures). If you eat food, you’re already familiar with inflation’s impact on groceries. We could go on for a week, but this is a long-winded disclaimer and I need to get to the point.

No Christian should ever adopt the mentality behind the phrase at the beginning of the second paragraph. Besides the crass and hateful language it represents, it’s a sinful way to view our president. Christians are supposed to respect their government leaders (I Pt 2.17). In that passage it’s not a suggestion, it’s an order. The word τιμᾶτε (timate) is an imperative. It means “to show high regard for” someone (BDAG, τιμάω).

Paul wrote, “You should pray for rulers and for everyone who has authority. Pray for these leaders so we can lead a quiet and peaceful life…” (I Tim 2.2). Paul was under an emperor similar to our own president. God’s expectations for Christian behavior don’t change when the president is bad. We don’t have to like him, but we certainly have to respect him and pray for him.

We should not expect to live with God forever if we talk about the president the way so many others do. I get it – it’s hard. Politicization of the medical field under his administration has had a direct impact on my own quality of life. Praying for/respecting the president is not easy at all. But it wouldn’t have been easy for Christians under any of the Roman emperors in the first century, either. If they could do it, so can we. Please think about the serious impact our words have on where we spend eternity. Our first allegiance is to God. If He’s really our King, we’ll have respect for our president.

Image courtesy Flickr.
Gay Marriage, Miley Cyrus, Clive Bundy, School Shootings

Gay Marriage, Miley Cyrus, Clive Bundy, School Shootings

 

Neal Pollard

The internet is such a great search tool.  Many, including Christians, use it on a daily basis to be informed, inspired, and intrigued. Yet, it seems to me in the years I have been blogging, and especially in the last year or two, that so many are most interested in provocative and salacious ideas.  Perhaps it is the same morbid curiosity that makes us rubberneck when driving past a wreck on the highway.  Yet, the metrics that indicates searches on my blog show a much greater interest in the political and social latest trends and topics than articles that are more straightforwardly biblical or doctrinal (i.e., grace, the judgment, worship, etc.).

Why are we so intrigued with marathon bombings, LGBT, missing airplanes, national tragedies, outrageous and outlandish behavior from athletes and celebrities, second amendment and other political and governmental topics, hot-button-issues in our brotherhood, or controversial topics?  Certainly, as we live in this world and particularly western culture, these are daily topics of conversation.  As we immerse ourselves in our technological tools (phones, tablets, computers), these are often the “trending topics.”

In our haste and zeal to slake our thirst for these things, let us be sure to also feed our souls on what will strengthen us and prepare us for the bigger fish we have to fry.  The blessed, righteous man is described as one “whose is in the law of the Lord, and in His law he meditates day and night” (Ps. 1:2).  That in no way means the righteous person is aloof and uninterested in his or her world, current events, and even popular icons of the age.  The key difference is on what he or she meditates upon and delights in.  What thrills and appeals to us more? What do we more actively pursue?

The answers to those questions are dependent upon the individual.  One can be both informed about the world and more interested in the Word.  However, may we each be cautioned about what proper balance is as well as where our greater interest lay.  What draws our attention and attracts us?  Let us be sure it is hunger and thirst for righteousness (Mat. 5:6) more than anything under the sun!