Categories
edification lectureship Uncategorized

Gleanings From The 2016 Bear Valley Lectures

Neal Pollard

  • We were honored with so many, enthusiastic guests (not including speakers and their families, we had brothers and sisters attending from Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming). Most of the Denver-metro area congregations had representation and nearly 30 congregations throughout the state were represented.
  • We were blessed by great congregational participation (this huge undertaking is underwritten financially by the Bear Valley Bible Institute and everyone associated with the school is involved in multiple tasks, but the Bear Valley congregation donated food, cooked for the banquet, helped set up, move things, and “break down” tables, chairs, providing security, coordinating parking, and the like, and attended in unprecedented fashion. From the leadership down, there was much support from the home crowd. This church is taking increasing “ownership” of this great, annual event).
  • We were reminded that God’s people want to hear from “The Book” (our textual studies continue to be popular with men, women, and teens. The ability to “walk through” a book of the Bible was met with constant, thoughtful compliments and enthusiasm! Letting God speak through His inspired Word is an unbeatable approach).
  • We were treated to great preaching and teaching throughout (it was put many ways, like “there was not a dud in the bunch,” “there was no let down, not even for one session,” and “there wasn’t a session you felt like you could skip to do something else.” That is a tribute to the men and women who handled their assignments so superlatively. So many good things were said about how rich and encouraging this year’s program was).
  • We were witnesses to continued growth (the first fact above gives insight into the fact that our attendance continues to climb.  We set attendance records at one session on Friday and five on Saturday, and we came close to matching records at several other sessions throughout the weekend. It was great seeing a “full house” throughout the lectureship).
  • We were made even more proud of our alumni (some of the most “rave reviews” about sessions concerned our alumni who spoke. We got to see and hear about the progress and success our graduates are having in their local works. So many of our former students showed up from near and far to support this year’s program. We learned at the banquet that, once again, a large number of our current student body received encouragement to come from our graduates. We want to deepen and strengthen our tie with the men who came through our school).
  • We were left anticipating an even better year next year (would you begin to make your plans, even now, to be a part of the 2017 Bear Valley Lectures? I hope so!).

14329874_10153962701025922_558042233759973345_n

Categories
edification example speech Uncategorized wisdom

Poking The Bear

Neal Pollard

It’s not a Social Media phenomenon, but those platforms have proliferated this problem.  Begin by making a provocative statement about race, religion, politics, other social issue, matter of judgment, or the like, then step back and watch while the unrestrained and undisciplined scratch and claw at one another. Soon, the issue is obscured by hateful remarks as combatants escalate the rhetoric. The tactic is utterly worldly, yet too often it is brothers and sisters in Christ with the sinister stick in their hands jabbing at the hibernating grizzly! My consistent question is, “Why?”  What is the purpose? Certainly, we should all be more critical thinkers, but such tactics as these generate much more heat than light. Rather than logical, rational points and counterpoints, they usually produce ad hominem attacks, reductio ad absurdum, and other Latin diseases!

When you consider how the New Testament governs our speech and guides our conduct in dealing with each other, you have to ask where the above-mentioned ploys fit in.  Here is a sampling of admonitions and instructions the Holy Spirit gives us through Scripture:

  • “So then we pursue the things which make for peace and the building up of one another” (Rom. 14:19).
  • “Let your speech always be with grace, as though seasoned with salt, so that you will know how you should respond to each person” (Col. 4:6).
  • “A perverse man spreads strife, and a slanderer intimate friends” (Prov. 16:28).
  • [God hates] “one who spreads strife among brothers” (Prov. 6:19b).
  • “Pursue peace with all men…” (Heb. 12:14a).
  • “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God” (Mat. 5:9).
  • “Love does not act unbecomingly” (1 Cor. 13:5a).
  • “Only conduct yourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ, so that whether I come and see you or remain absent, I will hear of you that you are standing firm in one spirit, with one mind striving together for the faith of the gospel” (Phil. 1:27).
  • “And the congregation of those who believed were of one heart and one soul…” (Acts 4:32).

Be careful. In an attempt to be clever, relevant, and cutting edge, could we instead be alienating, divisive, and polarizing? There’s a big difference. May we all pray for the wisdom to differentiate. Especially in a divided world that is watching how those who claim to be Christians speak, interact, and treat them and each other, may we “be shrewd as serpents and innocent as doves” (Mat. 10:16).  Be dove-imitators, not bear-pokers.

male_kodiak_bear_face

Categories
edification fellowship missionaries

On The Other Side Of Security

Neal Pollard

Gary Hampton tells the story of his first missionary trip, which he made in the 1980s—shortly after the “Jonestown Tragedy” and during a time of great national instability.  He recalls soldiers lining both sides of the runway, armed to the teeth, and having his bags checked thoroughly by those whose friendliness was not exactly established.  He says that there was nothing like being able to greet the local brethren on the other side of security, singing gospel songs with them en route to the town where they campaigned together.  I have felt similar relief in coming into places that were strange, unfamiliar, and potentially menacing in different parts of the world.

Do you wonder what it was like for the apostle Paul, who had just survived a horrific shipwreck only to be bitten by a deadly snake on the island where he was stranded.  Now, he had been on an Alexandrian ship once again bound for Rome, stopping at various cities along the way.  At one of them, Puteoli, Paul, Luke, and the rest of his fellow travelers “found brethren, and were invited to stay with them seven days. And so we went toward Rome. And from there, when the brethren heard about us, they came from as far as Appii Forum and Three Inns. When Paul saw them, he thanked God and took courage” (Acts 28:14-15).  Notice how the local Christians, however far from Paul’s hometown, made Paul feel—thankful and encouraged.

There is something special and unique about the church, by God’s divine design.  Even brothers and sisters you meet in other countries, who speak different languages, and whose background and culture are different from your own, can have that effect on you.  Worshipping with God’s people in different parts of the country so often has the same effect. I’ve heard stories (so have you) from families and individuals who remarked about how unfriendly the local church they visited was.  I’ve had a few experiences where I didn’t feel the warmth I thought was proper, but that’s not nearly the norm.  However, I don’t wait for the brethren to come to me.  I’m anxious to see them!  They are my family, even if we’ve never met.

As you count your blessings today, won’t you thank God for the transcendent blessing that is the spiritual family!  The church was God’s eternal purpose (Eph. 3:9-11).  How wonderful that it bolsters us in the brief period of time we exist between birth and eternity!