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attitude positivity preaching Uncategorized

I Just Can’t Share Their Bitterness

Neal Pollard

I write this as someone who has spent his entire life in a preacher’s home. I grew up a preacher’s kid, whose dad was fired twice (once for baptizing a black woman and later for standing against the “New Hermeneutic”). I have been a full-time preacher for nearly thirty years myself. Now, my sons are devoting their lives full-time to preaching. To an extent, our family’s lives have revolved around preaching. Have there been hurts, disappointments, and occasions of mistreatment? Certainly. Of course, plumbers, lawyers, accountants, engineers, and builders will tell you the same. But, we work with Christians, who should know better? That’s true, but they are still humans constantly struggling with the battle of self. 

My dad has always spoken of the value and blessing of the church, even when dealing with personal hurts. He loves the Lord and His church. As we grew up in the home, he taught us to have a high esteem for the precious bride of Christ. In college, I had one teacher who especially counseled us to look at the church–and the people who make it up–with hopeful, optimistic eyes. We generally find what we are looking for. If we are looking for injustices, offenses, and disappointments, we’ll see an endless supply of it whether we’re looking at elders, deacons, long-time members, or new or weak Christians. If we can view the foibles of others with patience, compassion, and empathy, we are likely to help each other grow and transform. We will definitely steer away from an “us versus them” mentality.

If you are in full-time ministry for any length of time, you will have some stories to tell. Some will be full of joy and excitement. Share these generously. They will encourage and edify. Some will be unbelievable, but not in a good way. Use wisdom and discretion about how, who and if you tell those. What are we hoping to accomplish by such sharing?

Preaching is not lucrative business. It’s not paradise on earth. It’s not easy and not everyone can (or should) do it. But, it’s the greatest work in the world! It constantly impacts eternity in seen and unseen ways, in a way that perhaps nothing else can match. There will be some lumps and bumps. Ask Paul (2 Cor. 11:23ff). But, listen to Paul, too. In prison, he wrote of rejoicing about preaching despite its various pitfalls (Phil. 1:14-24). Some seem bitter about how they have been treated in preaching, and I hope they can work through it. But, I love this life so much, and I just can’t share their bitterness!

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Our staff introducing themselves to the 2019 Future Preachers Training Campers
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attitude flight hope Kitty Hawk optimism Orville Wright positivity potential Wilbur Wright Wright Brothers

What Does God See In You?

Neal Pollard

The inimitable historian, David McCullough, has churned out another masterpiece in his new book, The Wright Brothers.  Chronicling their lives before, on, and after that famous December day in 1903 in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, McCullough, in his unique way, peels back the layers of the people who made the history.  One particular example of this is seen in the author’s conveyance of Wilbur Wright’s misgivings about what he was going to make of his life.  Writing to his older brother Lorin, Wilbur said, “The boys of the Wright family are all lacking in determination and push. That is the very reason that none of us have been or will be more than ordinary businessmen” (24). It is amusing to think that Wilbur made this statement in 1894, less than a decade before that historic first flight.  Every airplane trip you make is a testimony to the Wrights’ determination, push, and extraordinary industry of the bicycle shop brothers, Orville and Wilbur Wright.

What do you see when you look at your life?  Are you dismissive of your talents and opportunities?  Do you think yourself in terms of your “can’ts” or your “cans”?  Perhaps you are prone to discount your potential.

If that is you, you should consider the case of a few other people.  Moses resisted leadership, claiming to be a nobody (Exo. 3-4).  Saul hid himself in the baggage (1 Sam. 10:22).  Jeremiah apparently tried to hide behind his age (Jer. 1:6-7).  Timothy seems to have been fearful (2 Tim. 1:7).  Yet, each rose to a position of greatness and played an important part in God’s plan.  What was the “X” factor in every case?  As God told Judah through Jeremiah, “I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for calamity to give you a future and a hope” (Jer. 29:11).  Solomon would say, “Commit your works to the Lord and your plans will be established” (Pro. 16:3).  Then, a millennia later, Paul tells the church at Philippi, “It is God who is at work in you, both to will and to work for His good pleasure” (Phi. 2:13).

Relax! Take the pressure off of yourself because, frankly, it is not about you.  It is about the God who is at work in you.  Chart a course that puts Him first in your life and dedicate yourself to trying, as hard as you can, to please Him.  Isn’t He strong and smart enough to open the right doors?  Is He able to do great things? Yes!  The incredible thing about that is that He has chosen to do great things through lowly people like you and me! Stop and consider this.  What does God see in you? What will He do through you to His glory?  Never stop asking that question!