The Psalm About The Son

The Psalm About The Son

Monday’s Column: Neal At The Cross

Neal Pollard

There are several “Messianic Psalms,” psalms which contain predictive prophesy about our Savior. Psalm two is the first of these. The psalm itself is a “royal” psalm (one of nearly 20 of them), a psalm referring to kingship or reign. Some of these are about David and his rule (or that of his descendants), but some, like Psalm 2, are about King Jesus. As we walk through this short psalm (it has 12 verses), let us notice the various qualities of this “Son.”

HE IS ANOINTED (1-5)

The Hebrew word for “anointed” is “Messiah” and has a wide range of meaning. It is dual-fulfillment, meaning that it would refer to David but the New Testament makes clear its ultimate fulfillment is Christ (more on that in a moment). He is chosen for an office or work. He is depicted as amused by the kings and rulers efforts to resist Him (1-4), but also angry and furious that they would try (5). God in heaven (4) has a plan He will execute through His anointed.

HE IS KING (6)

Obviously, this attribute is connected with the first one. Kings are anointed. That word means “poured out” (TWOT 562). While anointing has a royal connection, it also has a worship connection. The drink offering was a part of Old Testament worship, done by the priest to pay homage to God. Jesus, the water of life, was poured out on the alter as a sacrifice for our sins. In Psalm 2:6, the Father installs this King. Indeed, Jesus is The King (1 Tim. 6:15; Rev. 19:16). 

HE IS GOD’S SON (7-12)

This passage is repeatedly cited by New Testament writers and applied to Jesus (Acts 13:33; Heb. 1:5; 5:5). This indicates intimate connection to the Father (7). They share nature or essence. In other words, this “Son” is Deity. There is also reference to “inheritance,” conveyed from Father to Son. What is inherited? “The nations” and “very ends of the earth.” That idea is not developed here, but elsewhere we find that we, those obedient to Christ, are His treasure (read Eph. 1:3-14). There is one more dimension to this Sonship. He is invincible, omnipotent in power. He breaks and shatters with His power, deserving deference from kings and judges.

HE IS LORD (11-12)

Truly, it is difficult to decipher the exact meaning of the last two verses. “Lord,” in verse 7, definitely refers to the Father. But, notice the parallelism (a connection of meaning by an echo of form) of verse 11-12.  “Worship the Lord” (11) is parallel to “do homage to the Son.” The heart of the psalm refers to Jesus as “God’s Son.” He certainly is Master or Ruler and elsewhere in psalms is called “Lord” (110:1). 

The Jews definitely saw this as Messianic, even if they rejected Jesus of Nazareth as the fulfillment of it. Spirit-guided New Testament writers leave no doubt that this Psalm refers to Him and finds fulfillment of Him. Look at what a Savior we have!  Chosen by God, sovereign, and divine. Oh what a Savior!

Our first sunset in Israel, looking out at the Mediterranean Sea from Ashkelon (July 4, 2017).